Controlling Weeds

Who doesn’t have weed problems? There are some things that can be done to prevent weed problems before they get overwhelming without resorting to typical yard chemicals. Certain types of weeds can indicate problems with your soil which if corrected may eliminate or reduce those types of weeds. Visit Weed Indicator Plants and Using Weeds to Read the Soil. Pre-emergent (prevents germination of seeds): corn gluten meal, sold under various brand names, has been shown to prevent seed germination as well as the chemical products sold for this purpose. Corn gluten meal should be applied in the cool of spring (when daffodils are blooming) and for even better control again in the cool of fall. It is safe for people, pets, wildlife, and other plants and will add some nitrogen to your soil. Avoid using on newly seeded areas or just before seeding. It may be necessary to wait six weeks before planting seeds but plants can be planted at anytime. Corn gluten meal is available in granular or spray forms plus in combination with a lawn fertilizer. Corn gluten meal in various forms is available at my store Basil & Rose When weeds are small scrape the soil with an action hoe, stirrup hoe, or Winged Weeder. This cuts the weeds off right at soil level. Mulching your soil covers weed seeds preventing many from germinating since many weed seeds need light to germinate. Mulches which are plant or compost based will feed your soil and since they do decompose and need to be replenished it is easy to change the type of mulch over time if desired. Bark, shredded leaves, pine needles, wood chips and compost are some of those options. Weed seeds are more easily able to work there way in between rocks and other types of …

Organic Lawn Care Products

Suggestions below for products to help you grow a healthy lawn. If you haven’t yet seen my YouTube video on organic lawn care you can see it here: Grow A Healthy Lawn Organically Organic lawn fertilizers provide slow release of nutrients and don’t harm soil life so help you have a healthier lawn. This is a good option for newly planted lawns or if you will be putting grass seed down to thicken a lawn or for a new lawn. If you want to control weeds check out Concern below instead. Fertilizing with either Lawn Restore or Concern once in the spring and once in the fall works great for a healthy lawn. Concern lawn fertilizer is an organic fertilizer which also contains corn gluten meal to prevent seeds from germinating. It will not kill existing weeds but provides prevention. Do not use where you will be planting grass seed because it will stop them also. Using Concern once in the spring and once in the fall provides the best help for weed protection. Bonide’s Maize is a spray corn gluten meal but does not contain fertilizer. This could be used with the Lawn Restore above or if you have already put down another type of fertilizer and don’t need either Lawn Restore or Concern. Do not use where you will be planting seeds because it will stop the grass seeds from growing. Maize can be used in other parts of your landscape where you will not be planting seeds but where you want to prevent weeds. Neptune’s Harvest is a fertilizer that could be used any time. I use it on my entire landscape plus for my houseplants. When sprayed directly on leaves the plant receives nutrients quickly. Watering it in allows the plants to receive the nutrients more …

13 Ideas for Garden Spring Cleaning

We think of Spring cleaning the house. What about Spring cleaning your garden? Spring cleaning can reduce effort later on and help your yard start looking good even before all your flowers are blooming and trees are leafed out. Here are 13 ideas for Garden Spring Cleaning: Prune fruit trees. Don’t know how? Check with your local county extension service for pruning demonstrations. After pruning spray with horticulture oil. Spray the entire tree – trunk and branches – ideally before blooming. Prune your roses after the first leaves appear. Cutting in the fall or too early in the Spring may stimulate growth which then dies back when there is colder weather possibly killing the entire plant. Roses may also be sprayed with horticultural oil. Cut back perennials and ornamental grasses that were not cut back in the fall. Ideally cut them back before they begin to grow in the spring. For most, cut back to 1” Pull out dead plants if you did not in the fall. Be careful, maybe it isn’t dead. If you know the plants are annuals in your climate (petunias, marigolds, tomatoes, as an example) then go ahead and rip them out. If they are not annuals keep in mind that plants do not show new life in the spring all at the same time. Rose of Sharon and other Hibiscus are two that are later at showing growth. Check mower blades, pruners, and other tools. Do blades need sharpening? Will power tools start? You don’t want to wait until you need them to see if they work properly. Remove leaves from your lawn. Any leaves left from fall and sitting on your lawn can contribute to lawn diseases. Put the leaves in your compost pile. Don’t have a compost pile? Start one now Weed control. …

Edible Plants for Your Landscape

Edible landscaping involves growing edibles in the landscape but not necessarily in the traditional sense where they are planted in a garden spot. Fruits, vegetables, and herbs including some less familiar types can contribute to an attractive landscape and also provide sources of food. Edible plants can be used as groundcovers, shrubs, trees, perennials, annuals, vines. Some edibles can successfully be grown as houseplants. This is especially nice if you live in a climate where such plants will not survive outdoors. Why do you want to grow edibles? Self Sufficiency, Save space, Variety, Economic, Environmental, Adventure Some thing so keep in mind when growing edibles: Start with what you know you will eat. Just because something is edible that does not mean it is tasty to you. Want to try something new? See if you can find it at a farmer’s market or grocery store first so you can try it. Some edibles will not produce much per plant – Saffron for example Be sure to accurately identify all plants before eating whether in your landscape or in the wild. Some edibles look very similar to toxic plants. Label plants when you plant them. How much effort do you want to go to? Blueberries require extra work in alkaline soils. Is it worth it? Research what will grow in your area. All plants below can and do grow in my zone 5/6 Utah area. Those listed under Indoors grow indoors in winter and most can spend the summer outdoors. Edibles in parking strips or along driveways may pick up toxins from automobiles. Plant as far away from the street as possible. Avoid areas with pressure treated wood or railroad ties due to chemicals in the wood which may stunt growth and/or be taken up by the plant. Use food safe …

Pesticides and Herbicides

Pesticides & Herbicides & Fertilizers Information everyone should know about pesticides and herbicides. Please pass the link to this page onto others whether they are gardeners or not.  Pesticides and herbicides are not only used in our yards but on the yards of neighbors, public property, and of course our food. I will add new links as I find them. If you have no other reason for avoiding synthetic pesticides, herbicides, and fertilizers keep in mind that most synthetics (including these) are made from petroleum products.  If you want to reduce the amount of petroleum used this would be the perfect way. Roundup/Glyphosate Monsanto Weed Killer Roundup Faces New Doubts on Safety in Unsealed Documents Guess Who’s Ghostwriting Monsanto’s Safety Reviews Glyphosate, pathways to modern diseases II: Celiac sprue and gluten intolerance Roundup: The Usual Suspect Studies Link Monsanto’s Glyphosate to Ocean Death Misgivings About Roundup – Soil Damage Health Problems Linked to Monsanto’s Roundup New Study: Huge Increase in U.S. Chronic Diseases Linked to Glyphosate Herbicides Autism and Glyphosate New Research Fuels Roundup Weedkiller Toxicity Concerns Monsanto’s Roundup Herbicide May Be Most Important Factor in Development of Autism and Other Chronic Disease Roundup Herbicide Linked To Overgrowth of Deadly Bacteria Round-Up and DNA Problems with glyphosate (active ingredient in Round-Up, etc.) Glyphosate Concerns Glyphosate Benefits Harmful Soil Fungi More on Glyphosate Health Outcomes of Ingesting Roundup and GMO Roundup Resistant Corn   2, 4-d What is wrong with 2,4-D? Herbicides Herbicides Hurting Hooves Study: Roundup and other pesticides directly linked to Parkinson’s, neurodegenerative disorders Do Pesticides Affect Our Children? Protect Your Child From These 5 Pesticide Threats Superweeds, Superpests: The Legacy of Pesticides Why Science Can’t Prove A Pesticide Is Safe Millions Against Monsanto Campaign 2011 Study links pesticides to childhood illnesses Herbicide May Make Plants Need More Water …

Organic Lawn Care

Whether or not you intend to use organic methods these tips will help you to have a better looking, healthier lawn. You may want to watch my YouTube video in addition to reading through this post. First of all: Do you really need all that lawn? Utah Rivers Council – Rip Your Strip.  Check local ordinances before replacing or installing parking strip or front yard landscapes. Lawn areas can be replaced with edibles or lower maintenance plants. I would not recommend growing edibles in parking strips due to contamination from cars (fuel, exhaust, etc) Why tend your lawn organically? Save money and time, safer for you, your family, and your pets, your lawn, and the environment. The following lawn care tips can reduce costs while keeping your lawn looking great. Mowing Mow when grass is dry and after 6 p.m. – lawn will be cooler then.I prefer to mow the evening before the morning when sprinklers are scheduled to come on. Remove no more than 1/3 of the grass blade. Alternate mowing direction. For example: one week mow North to South, the next week mow East to West. Cool season grasses such as Kentucky Blue Grass should be allowed to grow 2 1/2 – 3” in summer but can be cut to 2” in spring and fall (first and last mowings of the season only). This length helps the lawn to be healthier and can shade out many weeds. Be sure mower blades are sharp and free of chips. Leave clippings on the lawn. If the lawn is healthy and is mowed properly clippings should break down quickly. Clippings provide nitrogen and organic matter for the lawn. Clippings do not contribute to thatch. If you have clippings in piles on your lawn or coming into the house on shoes then …

Group Buy & Upcoming Events

If you wish to continue to receive emails about upcoming events and other information please resubscribe here: https://app.ohwo.com/lists/wd8644ye2090f/subscribe Group Buy:Wild Herb Card Decks      Are you interested in a group buy on my Wild Herb card decks?Regular price $26/pairGroup buy price $16/pairThis offer is available until January 16 This is the price if you pick them up in Bountiful, Utah. One person can pick up several decks to deliver to those in their area but those arrangements would be between those involved.Payment must be made to me at  or before pickup.Payment can be by credit card or cash if you come into the store. I will only ship outside of the Wasatch Front area and inside the U.S. and only in groups of 4 more sets. Shipping for 4 sets is about $8. Feel free to share this. Cards are printed on plastic: waterproof and tear resistant.All plants can be found in Utah and much of the Intermountain West. Some can be found throughout the world.Front of card: color photoBack of card: verbal description, edible use, medicinal use. List of plants: List of plants in both decks: Alfalfa, Amaranth, Arrowleaf Balsamroot, Birch, Burdock, Camas, Catnip, Cattail, Chicory, Chokecherry, Cleavers, Clovers red and white, Currants, Dandelion, Dock, Echinacea, Elderberry, Feverfew, Fireweed, Flax, Gumweed, Hawthorn, Horehound, Horsetail, Houndstongue, Juniper, Lambsquarters, Mallow, Milkweed, Miners Lettuce, Monarda, Mullein, Nettle, Nightshade, Oak, Oregon Grape, Pine, Pineapple Weed, Plantain, Poison Hemlock, Poison Hemlock and Yarrow – compared side by side, Poison Ivy, Prickly Pear, Puncture Vine, Purslane, Purslane and Spurge – compared side by side, Rose, Sagebrush, Salsify, Sego Lily, Serviceberry, Shepherds Purse, Strawberry, Sumac, Sunflower, Teasel, Thimbleberry, Thistle, Violet, Wild Lettuce, Yarrow, and Yucca Upcoming Events:Check the website calendar for registration details, more information, and future events: https://gardeninspire.com/eventsFor classes taught at Basil & Rose including breadmaking …