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Wild Edible & Medicinal Plants

You might be interested in wild edible plants due to curiosity or over concern about the food supply or you want to be prepared in case you were stranded somewhere. Here are products that can be helpful to your learning. Some items available through this website or at Basil & Rose in Bountiful, Utah. For links to other sites: Amazon Associates Program Disclaimer “Garden Inspire is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com. Amazon, the Amazon logo, AmazonSupply, and the AmazonSupply logo are trademarks of Amazon.com, Inc. or its affiliates. Wild Herb Card Decks printed on plastic (waterproof and tear resistant). Wild Herb Walks – check my website calendar or schedule a walk for your group. Walks are held based on weather and usually April through at least September. Wild Herb Classes – check my website calendar or schedule a class for your group. Utah Wildflower Poster Utah Endangered Plants poster Rocky Mountain Trees & Wildflowers identification booklet Wildcraft Game Preserving Wild Foods book

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Cranberries

One of most famous uses of cranberries is cranberry sauce. This is not something I enjoyed until trying the following recipe below. Whether you usually like cranberry sauce or not check out this recipe. Plus two more cranberry recipes below. Cranberries can be grown in your edible landscape although they will require more work if you don’t have acidic soil.Cranberry Sauce recipe from The World’s Healthiest FoodsI substitute one pear for the pineapple. This sauce is also good on ice cream, cheese cake, or pancakes. Two other recipes I just heard about and look forward to trying: Coarsely chop or grind cranberries with a little bit of orange. Add sugar. I want to try it with honey or maple syrup. This is not cooked. Cranberry Salsa https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j9_gi0A04PQ

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Poinsettias

Did you received a poinsettia and don’t know how to tend it or it isn’t doing well? Or is that poinsettia you were given for Christmas still around?  Would you like to keep it longer, perhaps even for years? Even if your poinsettia has dropped all of its leaves you may be able to rescue it. If you haven’t already remove the foil or plastic wrap.  Next if it is after Christmas repot in a pot about 2″ larger using potting soil or potting mix.  Never use garden soil in a pot.  Make sure the pot has drainage holes. Water your poinsettia.  I like to give plants a shower after repotting.  Place the pot in your shower and spray off the leaves using slightly warm water.  This will rinse off any dust or insects.  Also, be sure the potting soil is wet throughout.  Once your plant has dried off place in an area with indirect bright light away from furnace vents or other blasts of air – especially hot or cold air.   Check the soil moisture level at least once per week by sticking your finger into the soil.  The soil can be almost dry before watering. If there are no leaves just keep tending your poinsettia and most likely it will leaf out within a couple weeks. Your poinsettia may or may not flower in the future.  I don’t care whether mine does or not.  Most years it does.  I have found through experience and talking to those growing poinsettias in greenhouses that they will often flower without subjecting the poinsettias to periods of darkness. Subscribe to Garden Inspire Blog

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Fertilizing Indoor Plants

Houseplants may not need fertilized year round in cooler climates because they grow more slowly during the short days of winter. As the days get longer and growth increases fertilizer may help your plants look their best. I use a combination of fish emulsion and kelp at half strength – ½ T or each per gallon of water. There are also granular organic fertilizers than work well for houseplants.

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Seeds and Garden Planning

Seeds Yes, it is the time to be thinking about seeds (in case you weren’t already).Planning, Ordering, Planting. Think about what you want to grow.  What will you eat? What that is new to you would you like to try?  Do you write a list last year of what you planted, how much, when, and where?  This would be a good time to start for this year. Where do you want to grow it?  Outdoors? Indoors?  Where outdoors or indoors? When do you need to plant it?  Are you starting the seeds indoors? Winter sowing the seeds outdoors?  Planting in March, April, or May? Once you know what, how much, where, and when to plant you may be ready to start purchasing your seeds.  Soon is a good time. Seeds can be started now for things you want to plant outside in March.  Here in Utah March is a great time to plant cabbage and broccoli outdoors. I start some peppers now because even though they like warmer weather peppers tend to be slower germinating and growing than some other vegetables.  I start some tomatoes now too so I can plant a few early with protection.  I’ll start the rest later to be planted in May after the soil warms up.   Lettuce, spinach, arugula, and cilantro are among the herbs and vegetables can be planted from seed outdoors in March because they like the cooler weather. Some sources of heirloom and open-pollinated seeds (so you can save the seeds for replanting if you want to): Seed and Plant Sources

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What Was Really Served at The First Thanksgiving

What are some of the fruits and vegetables you have for your Thanksgiving meal? Have you thought about which ones may have been served at the First Thanksgiving? I don’t know that there is any record of what was served but there are possibilities of what was and what wasn’t. As far as fruits and vegetables: PumpkinPumpkin and other squashes may have been served at the First Thanksgiving although not necessarily as a pie. There are many delicious ways to serve pumpkin. Bread, cookies, mashed with a little butter mixed in or with cinnamon and/or cloves. Pumpkin can also be mixed half and half with potatoes for a nutritious buttery look. PotatoesSo called “Irish” potatoes are not from Ireland but are instead from the New World and may have been served at the original harvest festival. Sweet Potatoes Sweet PotatoesAlthough sweet potatoes are native to the Americas I don’t know if they would have been in the area but it is doubtful they would have been served with nuts, brown sugar, and marshmallows. Those things labelled as yams at your local store are actually sweet potatoes. Yams are a different thing entirely and not available so far at your local store if you live in the U.S. Sweet potatoes can be baked and served with butter, cut and baked as homestyle oven fries, mixed with potatoes for hashbrown, or baked into a pie similar to pumpkin pie. Sweet potatoes can also be eaten raw. CranberriesCranberries grow in and are native to the Northeastern United States so it is certainly possible that they were part of the meal. One of my favorite ways to have cranberries is this cranberry sauce recipe. Cranberries can also be baked in muffins or bread or made into a juice. One relative of the cranberry –

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