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Choosing Edible Houseplants

What can you grow as a houseplant that you can also eat? First: What would you eat?  If you aren’t going to eat it then why grow it? How much light do you have? You may have more light than you think. Note what times of day you get light and for how long. Generally direct sunlight is not required. My Aloe always bleaches out in direct sunlight. All of my plants receive less light than at my previous homes due to my plant room facing East and large trees outside. The plants listed can be grown in more light than as listed but won’t do well in less. The only time I have used artificial lighting is when starting seeds. If you don’t have much light: Spinach Chives Arugula Mint Cilantro Chervil Parsley Lettuce Beet greens Bok choy Celery Kale Peas Swiss Chard Medium Light: Ginger Turmeric Lemongrass Rosemary Banana Sweet Potato – vine Pomegranate Higher light: Basil – an annual but if you can delay flowering long enough you may be able to keep it around for awhile Aloe Vera (Yes, it is edible. See Herbs To Grow) Choosing edible houseplants Pepper in bloom Choosing Edible Houseplants Lemon almost ready to harvest Salvia including Sage and Pineapple Sage Scented Geranium – rose, lemon, peppermint, and more Thyme Oregano Savory Most fruiting plants including Peppers (yes, they are perennial and are grown as an annual in many climates because they freeze) Tomatoes – smaller varieties such as patio types would be better for most of us since the plants are smaller. The size of fruit has no relationship to the size of the plant. (perennials same as peppers Avocado Lemon Lime Grapefruit Orange Squash (bush style unless you have room for a vining type) My edible houseplants include three

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Planting Perennial Herbs

Perennial herbs such as sage, thyme, lavender, rosemary, oregano, winter savory, and mint have medicinal use as well as culinary. This is certainly not a complete list of the possible perennial herbs you might want to grow. These herbs are also good at repelling pests. Many people are interested in the medicinal use of herbs for a variety of reasons from concern about “traditional” medicine to concern about emergencies where medical personnel and supplies may not be readily available. Herbs also can provide some interest to food when fresh food may not be so readily available – especially if you are already in the habit of eating food that is not bland.  Whatever reason you have for growing herbs if you plant and begin using them soon you will already be familiar with their uses when you may need them.   Perennial herbs once planted can give pleasure and usefulness for many years. However, the woodier perennial herbs grow slower at first so if you get them planted you will be able to harvest sooner.   Why wait to plant them? Maybe you have just been putting it off.  Or, don’t know where to plant them or where to purchase plants? Search this site for the herb you want to grow to find tips for growing locations. My books also provide information about how to grow and use a variety of herbs. If you need help with where to buy them many local nurseries sell herbs or you can check the resources on this site on in the back of my books for some online nurseries that I like. Are you renting or otherwise not in a permanent location? Plant in pots for easy moving to a new location or ask your landlord about improving the landscape with some herbs.

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5 Ways to Control Mosquitos

You finally get outside and mosquitoes show up! What can you do? Here are 5 ways to help you control mosquitoes. For controlling mosquitoes in the landscape (and on you): Empty any water containers that are unnecessary. For pet water dishes, bird baths, and ponds there is another option. Bacillus thuringiensis v. israelensis is deadly to mosquito larvae and fungus gnats but safe for pets, birds, and fish. Also called B. T. var israelensis, it is available in a liquid but also a dry form as donut shaped “dunks” and small “bits”. There are other types of B.T. – one for controlling caterpillars and one for Colorado Potato Beetle so be sure you are getting the right one. Mosquito bits are available at Basil & Rose in Bountiful, Utah Planting mosquito repelling plants can also be helpful especially when planted around patios and decks. This is most helpful if the plants will be brushed against as people are walking past so the essential oils of the plants are released. Lemongrass (a relative of Citronella) is a famous one but is not hardy above zone 11 so for most of us will either need to be overwintered indoors as a houseplant or you will have to buy a new one each year. If you want to cook with lemongrass you may want to just bring it indoors. More cold tolerant herbs which are also mosquito repellents are mint and lavender. Mint should be grown in a pot anyway to avoid taking over your yard. Lavender can be planted in the ground in most climates and should overwinter just fine in a pot in many climates as long as the pot is large enough to provide insulation for the roots. A pot of 14” – 16” should work for either lavender or

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Growing Food With Water Restrictions

In the news there has been talk about water shortages – especially in California. I also wrote about concerns about water and food shortages in a previous post. Conserving water just makes sense but in some cases it is mandatory. Here are few suggestions to help you grow your own food in spite of water restrictions. Add compost to your soil to hold moisture. Compost also provides nutrients and soil organisms. Soil micro organism have been shown to plants obtain water and nutrients from outside their root zone plus provide disease protection. Plant in blocks instead of rows. Bare soil between plants dries out more quickly and gives space for weeds to grow. Mulch your soil. This keeps down weeds and holds moisture in to the soil. Keep mulch about 2 – 3” away from the trunk or stem of plants. Mulch with compost or bark which will add organic matter and nutrients to the soil. My preference is compost alone or compost with bark on top. Using rock creates heat so avoid using rocks or gravel for mulch. Plants such as succulents or other drought tolerant plants may rot if kept too moist so use less mulch or at least keep the mulch farther from those plants. Find out what is already edible in your yard – native plants, weeds, established plants. There may be plants in your yard that you did not know were edible. Check out my book on edible and medicinal plants to know what is already in your yard. Grow plants that can survive with less water. Many Mediterranean herbs including lavender, sage, oregano, rosemary, fennel, and thyme survive on less water. Artichokes, Sunchokes (Jerusalem Artichokes), Squashes, Goji berry and Okra are all edibles that can get by with less water. Asparagus and Rhubarb once

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Landscaping For Pets

Keep your pet safe while in your landscape. Pets should be considered when planning and tending your yard and garden (and even houseplants) since some plants are toxic to dogs, cats, and other pets. Organic methods also keep your pets safer. Pesticides on lawn, systemics on roses, and slug and snail baits are just some of the pesticide dangers in the landscape. Especially be careful with dogs since they tend to eat almost anything.   Just because we can eat it does not mean our pets should.  Because they can eat it does not mean we should.  Rhubarb leaves are toxic to humans but chickens do not problems with them. Some plants which are toxic to pets: Grapes and raisins – poisonous to dogs and cats.  Damage the kidneys. Avocados – poisonous to most species but especially birds.  Damages the heart muscle. Garlic and onions – poisonous to dogs and cats. Damage to red blood cells. Macadamia nuts – poisonous to dogs.  Muscle and nervous system problems. Chocolate – poisonous to most species but mostly dogs.  Nervous system and heart.   Pet Safe Foods – for dogs and cats: Apples Peas Green beans Popcorn – no salt, butter, GMO Carrots Sweet Potatoes Pumpkin  (one of my cats loves cooked pumpkin) Zucchini Squash Lettuce Blueberries For more information or if you have a pet poisoning contact the Pet Poison Helpline or ASPCA Poison Control  Chickens for pets?  Here is a seed mix to grow your own chickens feed! Remember to be careful about pesticides, herbicides, and fertilizers.  Most slug and snail bait is deadly to animals – What to do instead

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Planting Outdoors

Your yard might be buried under feet of snow or you might have no snow and sunny skies like here in Utah. In either case it really is time to think about what to plant and when. Besides, don’t you have spring fever? In many parts of the U.S. you can begin planting by March. If you have a few inches of snow that you can clear away even in a small area you can go ahead and plant. What you would plant soon would not be likely to be bothered by cold or freezing temperatures that we will still have. Peas, spinach, lettuce, arugula, cabbage, broccoli, kale, cauliflower and perennial herbs such as chives should be fine planted now. First though, you want to do something with your soil. My preference is to add a few inches of compost to the top of your raised beds or even right on the ground – then plant. This gives you some unfrozen ground to plant in, improves your soil, and will provide some nutrients for the plants. I usually plant my peas by March 5. St. Patrick’s Day is considered to be the day by which you should have planted your peas. When the weather is just right the seeds will emerge. It may take a bit longer than usual but the seeds seem to know when the time is right. If you have several feet of snow you might want to consider planting your early crops in pots. Use pots that can withstand the temperature changes. Fiberglass, plastic, and wood usually hold up for a few years at least. Unglazed terra cotta may last one or two seasons. Plant indoors using potting soil (not garden soil) which you have thoroughly watered before planting. Then place your pot outdoors. Don’t leave

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